Tag Archives: iSCSI

A sample forensic post mortem for a iSCSI Initiator (client) that had connectivity problems to the Server

My Team in The States report an issue with a Red Hat iSCSI Initiator having issues connecting to a Volume exported by a ZFS Server.

There is an issue on GitLab.

As I always do when I troubleshot a problem, I create a forensics post-mortem document recording everything I do, so later, others can learn how I fix it, or they can learn the steps I did in order to troubleshoot.

Please note: Some Ip addresses have been manually edited.

2019-08-09 10:20:10 Start of the investigation

I log into the Server, with Ip Address: xxx.yyy.16.30. Is an All-Flash-Array Server with RHEL6.10 and DRAID v.08091350.

Htop shows normal/low activity.

I check the addresses in the iSCSI Initiator (client), to make sure it is connecting to the right Server.

[root@Host-164 ~]# ip addr list 
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN qlen 1
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
    inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 ::1/128 scope host
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
2: eno1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:25:90:c5:1e:ea brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet xxx.yyy.13.164/16 brd xxx.yyy.255.255 scope global eno1
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::225:90ff:fec5:1eea/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
3: eno2: <NO-CARRIER,BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state DOWN qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:25:90:c5:1e:eb brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 
4: enp3s0f0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP qlen 1000
    link/ether 24:8a:07:a4:94:9c brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.168.100.164/24 brd 192.168.100.255 scope global enp3s0f0
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::268a:7ff:fea4:949c/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever 
5: enp3s0f1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP qlen 1000
    link/ether 24:8a:07:a4:94:9d brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.168.200.164/24 brd 192.168.200.255 scope global enp3s0f1
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever inet6 fe80::268a:7ff:fea4:949d/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                

I see the luns on the host, connecting to the 10Gbps of the Server:

[root@Host-164 ~]# iscsiadm -m session
 tcp: [10] 192.168.100.30:3260,1 iqn.2003-01.org.linux-iscsi:vol4 (non-flash)
 tcp: [11] 192.168.100.30:3260,1 iqn.2003-01.org.linux-iscsi:vol5 (non-flash)
 tcp: [7] 192.168.100.30:3260,1 iqn.2003-01.org.linux-iscsi:vol1 (non-flash)
 tcp: [8] 192.168.100.30:3260,1 iqn.2003-01.org.linux-iscsi:vol2 (non-flash)
 tcp: [9] 192.168.100.30:3260,1 iqn.2003-01.org.linux-iscsi:vol3 (non-flash)

Finding the misteries…

Executing cat /proc/partitions is a bit strange respect mount:

[root@Host-164 ~]# cat /proc/partitions
 major minor #blocks name
 8  0 125034840 sda
 8  1 512000 sda1
 8  2 124521472 sda2
 253 0 12505088 dm-0
 253 1 112013312 dm-1
 8 32 104857600 sdc
 8 16 104857600 sdb
 8 48 104857600 sdd
 8 64 104857600 sde
 8 80 104857600 sdf

As mount has this:

/dev/sdg1 on /mnt/large type ext4 (ro,relatime,seclabel,data=ordered)

Lsblk shows that /dev/sdg is not present:

[root@Host-164 ~]# lsblk
 NAME
 MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
 sda 8:0 0 119.2G 0 disk
 ├─sda1 8:1 0 500M 0 part /boot
 └─sda2 8:2 0 118.8G 0 part
  ├─rhel-swap 253:0 0 11.9G 0 lvm [SWAP]
  └─rhel-root 253:1 0 106.8G 0 lvm /
 sdb 8:16 0 100G 0 disk
 sdc 8:32 0 100G 0 disk
 sdd 8:48 0 100G 0 disk
 sde 8:64 0 100G 0 disk
 sdf 8:80 0 100G 0 disk

And as expected:

[root@Host-164 ~]# ls -al /mnt/large
 ls: reading directory /mnt/large: Input/output error
 total 0

I see that the Volumes appear to not having being partitioned:

[root@Host-164 ~]# fdisk /dev/sdf
 Welcome to fdisk (util-linux 2.23.2).
 Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them.
 Be careful before using the write command.
 Device does not contain a recognized partition table
 Building a new DOS disklabel with disk identifier 0xddf99f40.
 Command (m for help): p
 Disk /dev/sdf: 107.4 GB, 107374182400 bytes, 209715200 sectors
 Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
 Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 Disk label type: dos
 Disk identifier: 0xddf99f40
 Device Boot
 Start
 End
 Blocks Id System
 Command (m for help): q

I create a partition and format with ext2

[root@Host-164 ~]# mke2fs /dev/sdb1
 mke2fs 1.42.9 (28-Dec-2013)
 Filesystem label=
 OS type: Linux
 Block size=4096 (log=2)
 Fragment size=4096 (log=2)
 Stride=0 blocks, Stripe width=0 blocks
 6553600 inodes, 26214144 blocks
 1310707 blocks (5.00%) reserved for the super user
 First data block=0
 Maximum filesystem blocks=4294967296
 800 block groups
 32768 blocks per group, 32768 fragments per group
 8192 inodes per group
 Superblock backups stored on blocks:
 32768, 98304, 163840, 229376, 294912, 819200, 884736, 1605632, 2654208,
 4096000, 7962624, 11239424, 20480000, 23887872
 Allocating group tables: done
 Writing inode tables: done
 Writing superblocks and filesystem accounting information: done

I mount:

[root@Host-164 ~]# mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt/vol1

I fill the volume from the client, and it works. I check the activity in the Server with iostat and there are more MB/s written to the Server’s drives than actually speed copying in the client.

I completely fill 100GB but speed is slow. We are working on a 10Gbps Network so I expected more speed.

I check the connections to the Server:

[root@obs4602-1810 ~]# netstat | grep -v "unix"Active Internet connections (w/o servers)
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address               Foreign Address             State      
tcp        0      0 192.168.10.10:iscsi-target  192.168.10.180:55300        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 192.168.10.10:iscsi-target  192.168.10.180:55298        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 xxx.yyy.18.10:ssh            xxx.yyy.12.154:57137         ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 192.168.10.10:iscsi-target  192.168.10.180:55304        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 192.168.10.10:iscsi-target  192.168.10.180:55301        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 192.168.10.10:iscsi-target  192.168.10.180:55306        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 xxx.yyy.18.10:ssh            xxx.yyy.12.154:56395         ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 xxx.yyy.18.10:ssh            xxx.yyy.14.52:57330          ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 192.168.10.10:iscsi-target  192.168.10.180:55296        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 192.168.10.10:iscsi-target  192.168.10.180:55305        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 xxx.yyy.18.10:ssh            xxx.yyy.12.154:57133         ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 192.168.10.10:iscsi-target  192.168.10.180:55303        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 192.168.10.10:iscsi-target  192.168.10.180:55299        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 192.168.10.10:iscsi-target  192.168.10.176:57542        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 192.168.10.10:iscsi-target  192.168.10.180:55302        ESTABLISHED

I see many connections from Host 180, I check that and another member of the Team is using that client to test with vdbench against the Server.

This explains the slower speed I was getting.

Conclusions

  1. There was a local problem on the Host. The problems with the disconnection seem to be related to a connection that was lost (sdg). All that information was written to iSCSI buffer, not to the Server. In fact, that volume was mapped in the system with another letter, sdg was not in use.
  2. Speed was slow due to another client pushing Data to the Server too
  3. Windows clients with auto reconnect option are not reporting timeout reports while in Red Hat clients iSCSI connection timeouts. It should be increased

Dropping caches in Linux, to check if memory is actually being used

I encountered that Server, Xeon, 128 GB of RAM, with those 58 Spinning drives 10 TB and 2 SSD of 2 TB each, where I was testing the latest version of my Software.

Monitoring long term tests, data validation, checking for memory leaks…
I notice the Server is using 70 GB of RAM. Only 5.5 GB are used for buffers according to the usual tools (top, htop, free, cat /proc/meminfo, ps aux…) and no programs are eating that amount, so where is the RAM?.
The rest of the Servers are working well, including models: same mode, 4U60 with 64 GB of RAM, 4U90 with 128 GB and All-Flash-Array with 256 GB of RAM, only using around 8 GB of RAM even under load.
iSCSI sharings being used, with I/O, iSCSI initiators trying to connect and getting rejected, several requests for second, disk pulling, and that usual stuff. And this is the only unit using so many memory, so what?.
I checked some modules to see memory consumption, but nothing clear.
Ok, after a bit of investigation one member of the Team said “Oh, while you was on holidays we created a Ramdisk and filled it for some validations, we deleted that already but never rebooted the Server”.
Ok. The easy solution would be to reboot, but that would had hidden a memory leak it that was the cause.
No, I had to find the real cause.

I requested assistance of one my colleagues, specialist, Kernel Engineer.
He confirmed that processes were not taking that memory, and ask me to try to drop the cache.

So I did:

sync
echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches

Then the memory usage drop to 11.4 GB and kept like that while I maintain sustained the load.

That’s more normal taking in count that we have 16 Volumes shared and one host is attempting to connect to Volumes that do not exist any more like crazy, Services and Cronjobs run in background and we conduct tests degrading the pool, removing drives, etc..

After tests concluded memory dropped to 2 GB, which is what we use when we’re not under load.

Note: In order to know about the memory being used by Kernel slab cache in real time you can use command:

 slabtop

You can also check:

sudo vmstat -m

ZFS Improving iSCSI performance for Block Devices (trick for Volumes)

ZFS has a performance problem with the zvol volumes.

Even using a ZIL you will experience low speed when writing to a zvol through the Network.

Even locally, if you format a zvol, for example with ext4, and mount locally, you will see that the speed is several times slower than the native ZFS filesystem.

zvol volumes are nice as they support snapshots and clone (from the snapshot), however too slow.

Using a pool with Spinning Drives and two SSD SLOG devices in mirror, with a 40Gbps Mellanox NIC accessing a zvol via iSCSI, with ext4, from the iSCSI Initiator, you can be copying Data at 70 MB/s, so not even saturating the 1Gbps.

The trick to speed up this consist into instead of using zvols, creating a file in the ZFS File System, and directly share it through iSCSI.

This will give 4 times more speed, so instead of 70MB/s you would get 280MB/s.