Category Archives: MDRAID

Adding a RAMDISK as SLOG ZIL to ZFS

If you use ZFS with spinning drives and you share iSCSI, you will need to use a SLOG device for ZIL otherwise you’ll see your iSCSI connections interrupted.

What is a ZIL?

  • ZIL: Acronym for ZFS Intended Log. Logs synchronous operations to disk
  • SLOG: Acronym for (S)eperate (LOG) Device

In ZFS Data is first written and stored in-memory, then it’s flushed to drives. This can take 10 seconds or more.

So without SLOG it can happen that if a power loss occurs, you may loss the last 10 seconds of Data submitted.

The SLOG device brings security that if there is a power loss, after remounting the pool, the information in the SLOG, acknowledged to iSCSI clients, is not lost and flushed to the Hard drives conforming the pool. Basically this device keeps the writings that come from network and flushes to the Hard drives and then clears this data from the SLOG.

Normally I’m describing configurations with a fast device for SLOG ZIL, like one or a pair of NVMe drive or SAS SSD, most commonly in mirror a pool of 12 HDD drives or more SAS preferentially, maybe SATA, with 14TB or more each.

As the SLOG device will persist your Data if there is a power off, and submit to the pool the accepted transactions, it is clear that you cannot spare your SLOG ZIL device. It is needed to bring security when remotely writing.

But what happens if we have a kind of business where we don’t care about that the last 10 seconds writings may be lost? (ZFS will never get corrupted due to its kinda journal system), just because we are filling a Server the fastest possible, migrating from another, or because we are running workouts that can be retaken is some data is lost… do we really need to have the speed constrain of an SSD?. Examples are a Hadoop node, or a SETI@Home client. Tasks will be resumed if something failed.

Let me put in another way, we have 2 NIC 100Gbps, in bonding, so 200Gbps (equivalent to (25GB/s Gigabytes per second), 90 HDD drives that can work in parallel up to 250 MB/s each (22.5GB/s) and our Server has a pair or SAS SSD ZIL in mirror, that writes at 900 MB/s (Megabytes per second, so 0.9 GB/s), so our bottleneck or constraint is the SLOG ZIL.

Adding one RAMDISK, or better two RAMDISKs in mirror, we can get to much more highers speeds. I cannot tell you how much, but in my tests with regular configurations (8D+3P) I was achieving more than 2 GB (Gigabytes) per second sustained of Data to the pool. Take in count that the speed writing to the pool does not only depend on the speed on the ZIL, and the speed of the HDD spinning drives (slow, between 100 and 250 MB/s), but also about the config of the pool (number of vdevs, distributions of data and parity drives) and the throughput of your IOC (Input Output Controller), and the number of them.

Live real scenarios use to be more in the line of having 2x10GbpE cards, combined in bonding making 20Gbps, so being able to transmit 2.5GB/s. So to get the max speed of our Network this Ramdrive will do it. Also NVMe devices used as ZIL will do it.

The problem with the NVMe is that they are connected to the PCI Express bus, and so they are not hot swap. If one dies, you cannot replace without stopping the Server.

The problem with the SSD is that they are not made for writing, they will die, so you need at least a mirror and for heavy IO I strongly recommend you to go with Enterprise grade SAS SSD drives. Those are made to last.

SSD Enterprise grade are double price versus one common SSD, but that peace of mind and extra lasting is worth it. And you don’t need a very big device, only has to hold 10 seconds of Data at max speed. So if you can ingest Data through the Network at 20 Gbps (2.5GB/s) you only need approximately 25 GB of space of the SLOG. 50 GB if you want to be more than safe.

Also you can use partitions instead of complete devices for the SLOG (like for the ZFS pool, where you can add complete drives, or partitions).

If you write locally, and you have 4 IOC’s capable of delivering 8 GB/s each, and you write to a Dataset to the pool, and not to a ZVOL which are slow by nature, you can get astonishing combined speed writing to the drives. If you are migrating a Server to another new, where you can resume if power goes down, then it’s safe to disable sync (set async) while this process runs, and turn sync on when going live to production. If you use async you don’t need to use a SLOG.

4 IOC’s able to deliver 8 GB/s are enough to provide sustained speed to 90 HDD SAS drives. 90x200MB/s=18GB/s required at max speed or 90x250MB/s=22.5GB/s.

The HDD drives provide different speeds in the inner and in the outer areas of the drive, so normally those drives up to 8TB perform between 100 and 200 MB/s, and the drives from 10TB SAS to 14TB SAS perform between 145 and 250 MB/s. I cannot tell about the 16 TB as I’ve not tested them.

The instructions to set a Ramdrive and to assign to a pool are like this:

#!/usr/bin/env bash
RAM_GB=1
RAM_DRIVE_SIZE_IN_BYTES=$((RAM_GB*1048576))

if [[ $(id -u) -ne 0 ]] ; then
    echo "Please run as root"
    exit 1
fi

modprobe brd rd_nr=1 rd_size=${RAM_DRIVE_SIZE_IN_BYTES} max_part=0

echo "Use it like: zpool add carlespool log ram0"

If you created more than one Ramdisk you can add a mirror for the slog to the pool with:

zpool add carlespool log mirror /dev/ram0 /dev/ram1

You can partition the Ramdrive and add a partition but we want to add the whole ram device.

Obviously you cannot put other things to that Ramdisk (like the Metadata) as you need persistence for that.

In any case, please, avoid JBODs loaded of big HDD drives with low bandwidth micro SATA like 3Gbps per channel to the Server, and RAID. The bandwidth is too low. Your rebuilds will take forever.

With ZFS you’ll resilver (rebuild) only the actual data, not the whole drive.

iostat_bandwitdth.sh – Utility to calculate the bandwidth used by all your drives

This is a shell script I made long time ago and I use it to monitor in real time what’s the total or individual bandwidth and maximum bandwidth achieved, for READ and WRITE, of Hard drives and NMVe devices.

It uses iostat to capture the metrics, and then processes the maximum values, the combined speed of all the drives… has also an interesting feature to let out the booting device. That’s very handy for Rack Servers where you boot from an SSD card or and SD, and you want to monitor the speed of the other (SAS probably) devices.

I used it to monitor the total bandwidth achieved by our 4U60 and 4U90 Servers, the All-Flash-Arrays 2U and the NVMe 1U units in Sanmina and the real throughput of IOC (Input Output Controllers).

I used also to compare what was the real data written to ZFS and mdraid RAID systems, and to disks and the combined speed with different pool configurations, as well as the efficiency of iSCSI and NFS from clients to the Servers.

You can specify how many times the information will be printed, whether you want to keep the max speed of each device per separate, and specify a drive to exclude. Normally it will be the boot drive.

If you want to test performance metrics you should make sure that other programs are not running or using the swap, to prevent bias. You should disable the boot drive if it doesn’t form part of your tests (like in the 4U60 with an SSD boot drive in a card, and 60 hard drive bays SAS or SATA).

You may find useful tools like iotop.

You can find the code here, and in my gitlab repo:

https://gitlab.com/carles.mateo/blog.carlesmateo.com-source-code/-/blob/master/iostat_bandwidth.sh

#!/usr/bin/env bash

AUTHOR="Carles Mateo"
VERSION="1.4"

# Changelog
# 1.4
# Added support for NVMe drives
# 1.3
# Fixed Decimals in KB count that were causing errors
# 1.2
# Added new parameter to output per drive stats
# Counting is performed in KB

# Leave boot device empty if you want to add its activity to the results
# Specially thinking about booting SD card or SSD devices versus SAS drives bandwidth calculation.
# Otherwise use i.e.: s_BOOT_DEVICE="sdcv"
s_BOOT_DEVICE=""
# If this value is positive the loop will be kept n times
# If is negative ie: -1 it will loop forever
i_LOOP_TIMES=-1
# Display all drives separatedly
i_ALL_SEPARATEDLY=0
# Display in KB or MB
s_DISPLAY_UNIT="M"

# Init variables
i_READ_MAX=0
i_WRITE_MAX=0
s_READ_MAX_DATE=""
s_WRITE_MAX_DATE=""
i_IOSTAT_READ_KB=0
i_IOSTAT_WRITE_KB=0

# Internal variables
i_NUMBER_OF_DRIVES=0
s_LIST_OF_DRIVES=""
i_UNKNOWN_OPTION=0

# So if you run in screen you see colors :)
export TERM=xterm

# ANSI colors
s_COLOR_RED='\033[0;31m'
s_COLOR_BLUE='\033[0;34m'
s_COLOR_NONE='\033[0m'

for i in "$@"
do
    case $i in
        -b=*|--boot_device=*)
        s_BOOT_DEVICE="${i#*=}"
        shift # past argument=value
        ;;
        -l=*|--loop_times=*)
        i_LOOP_TIMES="${i#*=}"
        shift # past argument=value
        ;;
        -a=*|--all_separatedly=*)
        i_ALL_SEPARATEDLY="${i#*=}"
        shift # past argument=value
        ;;
        *)
        # unknown option
        i_UNKNOWN_OPTION=1
        ;;
    esac
done

if [[ "${i_UNKNOWN_OPTION}" -eq 1 ]]; then
    echo -e "${s_COLOR_RED}Unknown option${s_COLOR_NONE}"
    echo "Use: [-b|--boot_device=sda -l|--loop_times=-1 -a|--all-separatedly=1]"
    exit 1
fi

if [ -z "${s_BOOT_DEVICE}" ]; then
    i_NUMBER_OF_DRIVES=`iostat -d -m | grep "sd\|nvm" | wc --lines`
    s_LIST_OF_DRIVES=`iostat -d -m | grep "sd\|nvm" | awk '{printf $1" ";}'`
else
    echo -e "${s_COLOR_BLUE}Excluding Boot Device:${s_COLOR_NONE} ${s_BOOT_DEVICE}"
    # Add an space after the name of the device to prevent something like booting with sda leaving out drives like sdaa sdab sdac...
    i_NUMBER_OF_DRIVES=`iostat -d -m | grep "sd\|nvm" | grep -v "${s_BOOT_DEVICE} " | wc --lines`
    s_LIST_OF_DRIVES=`iostat -d -m | grep "sd\|nvm" | grep -v "${s_BOOT_DEVICE} " | awk '{printf $1" ";}'`
fi

AR_DRIVES=(${s_LIST_OF_DRIVES})
i_COUNTER_LOOP=0
for s_DRIVE in ${AR_DRIVES};
do
    AR_DRIVES_VALUES_AVG[i_COUNTER_LOOP]=0
    AR_DRIVES_VALUES_READ_MAX[i_COUNTER_LOOP]=0
    AR_DRIVES_VALUES_WRITE_MAX[i_COUNTER_LOOP]=0
    i_COUNTER_LOOP=$((i_COUNTER_LOOP+1))
done


echo -e "${s_COLOR_BLUE}Bandwidth for drives:${s_COLOR_NONE} ${i_NUMBER_OF_DRIVES}"
echo -e "${s_COLOR_BLUE}Devices:${s_COLOR_NONE} ${s_LIST_OF_DRIVES}"
echo ""

while [ "${i_LOOP_TIMES}" -lt 0 ] || [ "${i_LOOP_TIMES}" -gt 0 ] ;
do
    s_READ_PRE_COLOR=""
    s_READ_POS_COLOR=""
    s_WRITE_PRE_COLOR=""
    s_WRITE_POS_COLOR=""
    # In MB
    # s_IOSTAT_OUTPUT_ALL_DRIVES=`iostat -d -m -y 1 1 | grep "sd\|nvm"`
    # In KB
    s_IOSTAT_OUTPUT_ALL_DRIVES=`iostat -d -y 1 1 | grep "sd\|nvm"`
    if [ -z "${s_BOOT_DEVICE}" ]; then
        s_IOSTAT_OUTPUT=`printf "${s_IOSTAT_OUTPUT_ALL_DRIVES}" | awk '{sum_read += $3} {sum_write += $4} END {printf sum_read"|"sum_write"\n"}'`
    else
        # Add an space after the name of the device to prevent something like booting with sda leaving out drives like sdaa sdab sdac...
        s_IOSTAT_OUTPUT=`printf "${s_IOSTAT_OUTPUT_ALL_DRIVES}" | grep -v "${s_BOOT_DEVICE} " | awk '{sum_read += $3} {sum_write += $4} END {printf sum_read"|"sum_write"\n"}'`
    fi

    if [ "${i_ALL_SEPARATEDLY}" -eq 1 ]; then
        i_COUNTER_LOOP=0
        for s_DRIVE in ${AR_DRIVES};
        do
            s_IOSTAT_DRIVE=`printf "${s_IOSTAT_OUTPUT_ALL_DRIVES}" | grep $s_DRIVE | head --lines=1 | awk '{sum_read += $3} {sum_write += $4} END {printf sum_read"|"sum_write"\n"}'`
            i_IOSTAT_READ_KB=`printf "%s" "${s_IOSTAT_DRIVE}" | awk -F '|' '{print $1;}'`
            i_IOSTAT_WRITE_KB=`printf "%s" "${s_IOSTAT_DRIVE}" | awk -F '|' '{print $2;}'`
            if [ "${i_IOSTAT_READ_KB%.*}" -gt ${AR_DRIVES_VALUES_READ_MAX[i_COUNTER_LOOP]%.*} ]; then
                AR_DRIVES_VALUES_READ_MAX[i_COUNTER_LOOP]=${i_IOSTAT_READ_KB}
                echo -e "New Max Speed Reading for ${s_COLOR_BLUE}$s_DRIVE${s_COLOR_NONE} at ${s_COLOR_RED}${i_IOSTAT_READ_KB} KB/s${s_COLOR_NONE}"
            echo
            fi
            if [ "${i_IOSTAT_WRITE_KB%.*}" -gt ${AR_DRIVES_VALUES_WRITE_MAX[i_COUNTER_LOOP]%.*} ]; then
                AR_DRIVES_VALUES_WRITE_MAX[i_COUNTER_LOOP]=${i_IOSTAT_WRITE_KB}
                echo -e "New Max Speed Writing for ${s_COLOR_BLUE}$s_DRIVE${s_COLOR_NONE} at ${s_COLOR_RED}${i_IOSTAT_WRITE_KB} KB/s${s_COLOR_NONE}"
            fi

            i_COUNTER_LOOP=$((i_COUNTER_LOOP+1))
        done
    fi

    i_IOSTAT_READ_KB=`printf "%s" "${s_IOSTAT_OUTPUT}" | awk -F '|' '{print $1;}'`
    i_IOSTAT_WRITE_KB=`printf "%s" "${s_IOSTAT_OUTPUT}" | awk -F '|' '{print $2;}'`

    # CAST to Integer
    if [ "${i_IOSTAT_READ_KB%.*}" -gt ${i_READ_MAX%.*} ]; then
        i_READ_MAX=${i_IOSTAT_READ_KB%.*}
        s_READ_PRE_COLOR="${s_COLOR_RED}"
        s_READ_POS_COLOR="${s_COLOR_NONE}"
        s_READ_MAX_DATE=`date`
        i_READ_MAX_MB=$((i_READ_MAX/1024))
    fi
    # CAST to Integer
    if [ "${i_IOSTAT_WRITE_KB%.*}" -gt ${i_WRITE_MAX%.*} ]; then
        i_WRITE_MAX=${i_IOSTAT_WRITE_KB%.*}
        s_WRITE_PRE_COLOR="${s_COLOR_RED}"
        s_WRITE_POS_COLOR="${s_COLOR_NONE}"
        s_WRITE_MAX_DATE=`date`
        i_WRITE_MAX_MB=$((i_WRITE_MAX/1024))
    fi

    if [ "${s_DISPLAY_UNIT}" == "M" ]; then
        # Get MB
        i_IOSTAT_READ_UNIT=${i_IOSTAT_READ_KB%.*}
        i_IOSTAT_WRITE_UNIT=${i_IOSTAT_WRITE_KB%.*}
        i_IOSTAT_READ_UNIT=$((i_IOSTAT_READ_UNIT/1024))
        i_IOSTAT_WRITE_UNIT=$((i_IOSTAT_WRITE_UNIT/1024))
    fi

    # When a MAX is detected it will be displayed in RED
    echo -e "READ  ${s_READ_PRE_COLOR}${i_IOSTAT_READ_UNIT} MB/s ${s_READ_POS_COLOR} (${i_IOSTAT_READ_KB} KB/s) Max: ${i_READ_MAX_MB} MB/s (${i_READ_MAX} KB/s) (${s_READ_MAX_DATE})"
    echo -e "WRITE ${s_WRITE_PRE_COLOR}${i_IOSTAT_WRITE_UNIT} MB/s ${s_WRITE_POS_COLOR} (${i_IOSTAT_WRITE_KB} KB/s) Max: ${i_WRITE_MAX_MB} MB/s (${i_WRITE_MAX} KB/s) (${s_WRITE_MAX_DATE})"
    if [ "$i_LOOP_TIMES" -gt 0 ]; then
        i_LOOP_TIMES=$((i_LOOP_TIMES-1))
    fi
done

Solving a persistent MD Array problem in RHEL7.4 (Dual Port SAS drives)

Ok, so I lend one of my Servers to two of my colleagues in The States, that required to prepare some test for a customer. I always try to be nice and to stimulate sales across the organizations I help, so if they need a Server for a PoC and demo to a customer, they know they can count on me.

It is important to remark that the Servers I was using add two motherboards, with their CPU and RAM, and Dual Port SAS drives. We had those Servers so we can implement High Availability. The Dual Port SAS allow two different computers or IO controllers to access the same drive at the same time.

I work with Declustered RAID, DRAID, and ZFS.

The Server was a 4U90, so a 4U Server with 90 SAS3 spinning drives and 4 SSD. Drives are Dual Ported, and two Controllers (motherboard + CPU + RAM) have access simultaneously to the drives for HA.

After their tests my colleagues, returned me the Server, and I needed to use it and my surprise was when I tried to provision with ZFS and I encountered problems. Not much in the logs. Please note I was using only one node (or controller), and the other was not in use but they ask me to keep the OS and the data (in 2xMD drive). I shutdown the node A after the Engineers in San Jose powered the Server off, so only my node was working.

I checked:

cat /proc/mdstat

And that was the thing 8 MD Arrays where there.

[root@4u90-B ~]# cat /proc/mdstat 
Personalities : 
md2 : inactive sdba1[9](S) sdag1[7](S) sdaf1[3](S)
11720629248 blocks super 1.2

md1 : inactive sdax1[7](S) sdad1[5](S) sdac1[1](S) sdae1[9](S)
12056071168 blocks super 1.2

md0 : inactive sdat1[1](S) sdav1[9](S) sdau1[5](S) sdab1[7](S) sdaa1[3](S)
19534382080 blocks super 1.2

md4 : inactive sdbf1[9](S) sdbe1[5](S) sdbd1[1](S) sdal1[7](S) sdak1[3](S)
19534382080 blocks super 1.2

md5 : inactive sdam1[1](S) sdan1[5](S) sdao1[9](S)
11720629248 blocks super 1.2

md8 : inactive sdcq1[7](S) sdz1[2](S)
7813752832 blocks super 1.2

md7 : inactive sdbm1[7](S) sdar1[1](S) sdy1[9](S) sdx1[5](S)
15627505664 blocks super 1.2

md3 : inactive sdaj1[9](S) sdai1[5](S) sdah1[1](S)
11720629248 blocks super 1.2

md6 : inactive sdaq1[7](S) sdap1[3](S) sdr1[8](S) sdp1[0](S)
15627505664 blocks super 1.2

Ok. So I stop the Arrays

mdadm --stop /dev/md127

And then I zero the superblock:

mdadm --zero-superblock /dev/sdb1

After doing this for all I try to provision and… surprise! does not work. /dev/md127 has respawned like in the old times from Doom video game.

I check the mdmonitor service and even disable it.

systemctl disable mdmonitor

I repeat the process.

And /dev/md127 appears again, using another device.

At this point, just in case, I check the other controller, which should be powered off.

Ok, it was on. With different Ip, so it was not answering to ping, but I still had access to BMC//IPMI. After confirming with my colleagues that I can shutdown that node (they did not turn it on apparently) I launch the poweroff command, and repeat, same!.

I see that the poweroff command on the second Controller is doing a reboot, not poweroff. Is a Firmware issue I find. So I access to the Linux from the management tool and I launch the halt command that makes it not respond to the ping anymore.

I repeat the process, and still the ghost md array appears there, and blocks me from doing my zpool create.

The /etc/mdadm.conf file did not exist (by default is not created).

I try a more aggressive approach:

DRIVES=`cat /proc/partitions | grep 3907018584 | awk '{ print $4; }'`

for DRIVE in $DRIVES; do echo "Trying /dev/${DRIVE}1"; mdadm --examine /dev/${DRIVE}1; done

Ok. And destruction time:

for DRIVE in $DRIVES; do echo "Trying /dev/${DRIVE}"; wipefs -a -f /dev/${DRIVE}; done

for DRIVE in $DRIVES; do echo "Trying /dev/${DRIVE}1"; mdadm --zero-superblock /dev/${DRIVE}1; done

Apparently the system is clean, but still I cannot provision, and /dev/md127 respawns and reappears all the time.

After googling and not finding anything about this problem, and my colleagues no having clue about what is causing this, I just proceed with a simple solution, as I need the Server for my company completing the tests in the next 24 hours.

So I create the file /etc/mdadm.conf with this content:

[root@draid-08 ~]# cat /etc/mdadm.conf 
AUTO -all

After that I rebooted the Server and I saw the infamous /dev/md127 is not there and I’m able to provision.

I share the solution as it may help other people.

The most straightforward procedure would had been reinstalling clean the OS, but this operation is very slow when simulating a Virtual CD remotely, so it was worth fixing that as OS level, as I save one day delaying my work.