Tag Archives: Jenkins

Install jenkins on Docker in ubuntu in 4 minutes

Following the official documentation:

https://www.jenkins.io/doc/book/installing/docker/#setup-wizard

The steps are:

Create the network bridge named jenkins

docker network create jenkins

to execute Docker commands inside jenkins nodes we will use docker:dind

docker run \
  --name jenkins-docker \
  --rm \
  --detach \
  --privileged \
  --network jenkins \
  --network-alias docker \
  --env DOCKER_TLS_CERTDIR=/certs \
  --volume jenkins-docker-certs:/certs/client \
  --volume jenkins-data:/var/jenkins_home \
  --publish 2376:2376 \
  docker:dind \
  --storage-driver overlay2

Created a Dockerfile with these contents:

FROM jenkins/jenkins:2.346.1-jdk11
USER root
RUN apt-get update && apt-get install -y lsb-release
RUN curl -fsSLo /usr/share/keyrings/docker-archive-keyring.asc \
  https://download.docker.com/linux/debian/gpg
RUN echo "deb [arch=$(dpkg --print-architecture) \
  signed-by=/usr/share/keyrings/docker-archive-keyring.asc] \
  https://download.docker.com/linux/debian \
  $(lsb_release -cs) stable" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/docker.list
RUN apt-get update && apt-get install -y docker-ce-cli
USER jenkins
RUN jenkins-plugin-cli --plugins "blueocean:1.25.5 docker-workflow:1.28"

Build it:

docker build -t myjenkins-blueocean:2.346.1-1 .

Run the Container:

docker run \
  --name jenkins-blueocean \
  --restart=on-failure \
  --detach \
  --network jenkins \
  --env DOCKER_HOST=tcp://docker:2376 \
  --env DOCKER_CERT_PATH=/certs/client \
  --env DOCKER_TLS_VERIFY=1 \
  --publish 8080:8080 \
  --publish 50000:50000 \
  --volume jenkins-data:/var/jenkins_home \
  --volume jenkins-docker-certs:/certs/client:ro \
  myjenkins-blueocean:2.346.1-1

See the Id of the running Containers:

docker ps

As in my case my jenkins container Id is 77b6a5a7ae8d in order to know the jenkins administrator password I check the logs for my jenkins Container with docker logs 77b6a5a7ae8d:

docker logs 77b6a5a7ae8d
Running from: /usr/share/jenkins/jenkins.war
webroot: EnvVars.masterEnvVars.get("JENKINS_HOME")
2022-06-26 21:02:05.492+0000 [id=1]	INFO	org.eclipse.jetty.util.log.Log#initialized: Logging initialized @549ms to org.eclipse.jetty.util.log.JavaUtilLog
2022-06-26 21:02:05.583+0000 [id=1]	INFO	winstone.Logger#logInternal: Beginning extraction from war file
2022-06-26 21:02:05.613+0000 [id=1]	WARNING	o.e.j.s.handler.ContextHandler#setContextPath: Empty contextPath
2022-06-26 21:02:05.674+0000 [id=1]	INFO	org.eclipse.jetty.server.Server#doStart: jetty-9.4.45.v20220203; built: 2022-02-03T09:14:34.105Z; git: 4a0c91c0be53805e3fcffdcdcc9587d5301863db; jvm 11.0.15+10
2022-06-26 21:02:05.986+0000 [id=1]	INFO	o.e.j.w.StandardDescriptorProcessor#visitServlet: NO JSP Support for /, did not find org.eclipse.jetty.jsp.JettyJspServlet
2022-06-26 21:02:06.020+0000 [id=1]	INFO	o.e.j.s.s.DefaultSessionIdManager#doStart: DefaultSessionIdManager workerName=node0
2022-06-26 21:02:06.020+0000 [id=1]	INFO	o.e.j.s.s.DefaultSessionIdManager#doStart: No SessionScavenger set, using defaults
2022-06-26 21:02:06.021+0000 [id=1]	INFO	o.e.j.server.session.HouseKeeper#startScavenging: node0 Scavenging every 600000ms
2022-06-26 21:02:06.463+0000 [id=1]	INFO	hudson.WebAppMain#contextInitialized: Jenkins home directory: /var/jenkins_home found at: EnvVars.masterEnvVars.get("JENKINS_HOME")
2022-06-26 21:02:06.647+0000 [id=1]	INFO	o.e.j.s.handler.ContextHandler#doStart: Started w.@7cf7aee{Jenkins v2.346.1,/,file:///var/jenkins_home/war/,AVAILABLE}{/var/jenkins_home/war}
2022-06-26 21:02:06.668+0000 [id=1]	INFO	o.e.j.server.AbstractConnector#doStart: Started ServerConnector@4c402120{HTTP/1.1, (http/1.1)}{0.0.0.0:8080}
2022-06-26 21:02:06.669+0000 [id=1]	INFO	org.eclipse.jetty.server.Server#doStart: Started @1727ms
2022-06-26 21:02:06.669+0000 [id=25]	INFO	winstone.Logger#logInternal: Winstone Servlet Engine running: controlPort=disabled
2022-06-26 21:02:06.925+0000 [id=32]	INFO	jenkins.InitReactorRunner$1#onAttained: Started initialization
2022-06-26 21:02:07.214+0000 [id=39]	INFO	jenkins.InitReactorRunner$1#onAttained: Listed all plugins
2022-06-26 21:02:10.781+0000 [id=47]	INFO	jenkins.InitReactorRunner$1#onAttained: Prepared all plugins
2022-06-26 21:02:10.794+0000 [id=35]	INFO	jenkins.InitReactorRunner$1#onAttained: Started all plugins
2022-06-26 21:02:10.803+0000 [id=42]	INFO	jenkins.InitReactorRunner$1#onAttained: Augmented all extensions
WARNING: An illegal reflective access operation has occurred
WARNING: Illegal reflective access by org.codehaus.groovy.vmplugin.v7.Java7$1 (file:/var/jenkins_home/war/WEB-INF/lib/groovy-all-2.4.21.jar) to constructor java.lang.invoke.MethodHandles$Lookup(java.lang.Class,int)
WARNING: Please consider reporting this to the maintainers of org.codehaus.groovy.vmplugin.v7.Java7$1
WARNING: Use --illegal-access=warn to enable warnings of further illegal reflective access operations
WARNING: All illegal access operations will be denied in a future release
2022-06-26 21:02:11.634+0000 [id=30]	INFO	jenkins.InitReactorRunner$1#onAttained: System config loaded
2022-06-26 21:02:11.635+0000 [id=30]	INFO	jenkins.InitReactorRunner$1#onAttained: System config adapted
2022-06-26 21:02:11.642+0000 [id=48]	INFO	jenkins.InitReactorRunner$1#onAttained: Loaded all jobs
2022-06-26 21:02:11.645+0000 [id=46]	INFO	jenkins.InitReactorRunner$1#onAttained: Configuration for all jobs updated
2022-06-26 21:02:11.668+0000 [id=67]	INFO	hudson.model.AsyncPeriodicWork#lambda$doRun$1: Started Download metadata
2022-06-26 21:02:11.675+0000 [id=67]	INFO	hudson.model.AsyncPeriodicWork#lambda$doRun$1: Finished Download metadata. 4 ms
2022-06-26 21:02:11.733+0000 [id=52]	INFO	jenkins.install.SetupWizard#init: 

*************************************************************
*************************************************************
*************************************************************

Jenkins initial setup is required. An admin user has been created and a password generated.
Please use the following password to proceed to installation:

3de0910b83894b9294989552e6fa9773

This may also be found at: /var/jenkins_home/secrets/initialAdminPassword

*************************************************************
*************************************************************
*************************************************************

2022-06-26 21:02:22.901+0000 [id=52]	INFO	jenkins.InitReactorRunner$1#onAttained: Completed initialization
2022-06-26 21:02:23.013+0000 [id=24]	INFO	hudson.lifecycle.Lifecycle#onReady: Jenkins is fully up and running

In my case the password is at the bottom, between the stars: 3de0910b83894b9294989552e6fa9773

Go with your browser to: http://localhost:8080

News from the Blog 2021-11-11

New Articles

How to communicate with your Python program running inside a Docker Container, using Linux Signals

Hope you’ll have fun reading this article:

Communicating with Docker Containers via Linux Signals and Python

I migrated my last services from Amazon and the blog to Google Compute Engine (GCE / GCP)

I wrote a Postmortem analysis about the process of migrating my last services from my 11 year old Amazon account.

Updates

Updates to articles

I updated the article about Python weird things that you may not know adding the Ellipsis …

I’ve been working in some Cassandra examples. I may publish an article soon about using it from Python and Docker.

Updates to My Books

I updated my Python and Docker books.

I’m currently writing a book about using Amazon AWS Python SDK (boto3).

Updates to Open Source projects

I have updated ctop, fixed two bugs and increased Code Coverage.

I made a new tag and released the last Stable Version:

https://gitlab.com/carles.mateo/ctop/-/tags/0.8.7

On top of my local Unit Testing, I have Jenkins checking that I don’t commit anything that breaks the Tests.

Some time ago I wrote some articles about how you can setup jenkins in a Docker Container.

Miscellaneous

Charity

I’ve donated to Wikipedia.

Only 2% of the viewers donate, so I answered the call every time it was made.

This is my 5th donation to Wikimedia.

I consider that Freedom is very important.

I bought these new books

One of my secrets to be on top is that I’m always studying.

I study all the time, at work and in my free time.

I use Linux Academy and I buy books in paper. I don’t connect with reading in tablets. I think information is stored better when read in paper. I use also a marker and pointers to keep a direct access to the most interesting points on the books.

And I study all kind of themes. Obviously I know a lot of Web Scraping, but there is always room for learning more. And whatever new I learn helps me to be better with my students and more clear writing my books.

I’ve never been a Front End, but I’ve been able to fix bugs in the Front End engines from the companies I worked for, like Privalia. I was passed a bug that prevented the Internet Explorer users to buy just one hour before we launching a massive campaign. I debugged and I found a variable named “value” so the html looked like <input name="value" value="">. In less than 30 minutes I proved to the incredulous Head of Development and the CTO that a bug in Internet Explored was causing a conflict when fetching the value from the input named value. We deployed to Production the update and the campaign was a total success. So I consider knowing Javascript and Front also a need, even if I don’t work directly with it. I want to be able to understand all the requirements and possibilities, and weaknesses, so I can fix bugs and save the day. That allowed me to fix scalability problems in Nodejs and Phantomjs projects too. (They are Javascript Server Side, event driven, projects)

It seems that Amazon.co.uk works well again for Ireland. My two last orders arrived on time and I had no problems of border taxes apparently.

Nice Python article

I enjoyed a lot this article, cause explains part of what I did with my student and friend Albert, in a project that analyzes the access logs from Apache for patterns of attempts of exploits, then feeds a database, and then blocks those offender Ip Addresses in the Firewall.

The article only covers the part of Pandas, of reading the access.log file and working with it, but is a very well redacted article:

https://mmas.github.io/read-apache-access-log-pandas

Nice Virtual Volumes article from VMware

I prefer Open Source, but there are very good commercial products too.

I liked this article about Virtual Volumes from VMWare:

Understanding Virtual Volumes (vVols) in VMware vSphere 6.7/7.0 (2113013)

https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/2113013

Thanks Blizzard (again)

There is a very nice initiative where we can nominate 4 colleagues a year, that we think that deserve a recognition.

My colleagues voted for me, so I received a gift voucher that I can spend in Ireland stores like Ikea, Pc World, Argos, Adidas, App Store & iTunes…

So thanks a million buds. :)

Creating Jenkins configurations for your projects

Obviously for companies is a must, but if you work in your own projects, it will be super great that you configure Jenkins, so you have continuous feedback about if something breaks.

I’ll show you how to configure Jenkins for several projects using only your main computer/laptop.

Check my past article about setting up Jenkins in Docker.

Adding a new Freestyle project

Click on top left: New item.

Then give it an appropriate name and choose Freestyle Project.

Take in count that the name given will be used as the name of the workspace, so you may want to avoid special characters.

It is very convenient to let Jenkins deal with your repository changes instead of using shell commands. So I’m going to fill this section.

I also provided credentials, so Jenkins can log to my Gitlab.

This kind of project is the most simple and we will use the same Docker Container where Jenkins resides, to run the Unit Testing of our code.

We are going to select to Build periodically.

If your Server is in Internet, you can active the Web Hooks so your Jenkins is noticed via a web connection from GitLab, GitHub or your CVS provider. As I’m strictly running this at home, Jenkins will be periodically check for changes in the repository and do nothing if there are no changes.

I’ll set H * * * * so Jenkins will try every hour.

Go down and select Add Build Step:

Select Execute shell.

Then add a basic echo command to print in the Console Output, and ls command so you see what is in the default’s directory your shell script is executing in.

Now save your project.

And go back to Dashboard.

Click inside of Neurona.cat to view Project’s Dashboard.

Click: Build Now. And then click on the Build task (Apr 5, 2021, 10:31 AM)

Click on Console Output.

You’ll see a verbose log of everything that happened.

You’ll see for example that Jenkins has put the script on the path of the git project folder that we instructed before to clone/pull.

This example doesn’t have test. Let’s see one with Unit Test.

Running Unit Testing with pytest

If we enter the project CTOP and then select Configure you’ll see the steps I did for making it do the Unite Testing.

In my case I wanted to have several steps, one per each Unit Test file.

If each one of them I’ve to enter the right directory before launching any test.

If you open the last successful build and and select Console Output you’ll see all the tests, going well.

If a test will go wrong, pytest will exit with Exit Code different of 0, and so Jenkins will detect it and show that the Build Fails.

Building a Project from Pipeline

Pipeline is the set of plugins that allow us to do Continuous Deployment.

Inform the information about your git project.

Then in your gitlab or github project create a file named Jenkinsfile.

Jenkins will look for it when it clones your repo, to build the Pipeline.

Here is my Jenkinsfile in https://gitlab.com/carles.mateo/python_combat_guide/-/blob/master/Jenkinsfile

pipeline {
    agent any
    stages {
        stage('Show Environment') {
            steps {
                echo 'Showing the environment'
                sh 'ls -hal'
            }
        }
        stage('Updating from repository') {
            steps {
                echo 'Grabbing from repository'
                withCredentials([usernamePassword(credentialsId: 'ssh-fast', usernameVariable: 'USERNAME', passwordVariable: 'USERPASS')]) {
                    script {
                        sh "sshpass -p '$USERPASS' -v ssh -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no $USERNAME@$ip_fast 'git clone https://gitlab.com/carles.mateo/python_combat_guide.git; cd python_combat_guide; git pull'"
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        stage('Build Docker Image') {
            steps {
                echo 'Building Docker Container'
                withCredentials([usernamePassword(credentialsId: 'ssh-fast', usernameVariable: 'USERNAME', passwordVariable: 'USERPASS')]) {
                    script {
                        sh "sshpass -p '$USERPASS' -v ssh -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no $USERNAME@$ip_fast 'cd python_combat_guide; docker build -t python_combat_guide .'"
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        stage('Run the Tests') {
            steps {
                echo "Running the tests from the Container"
                withCredentials([usernamePassword(credentialsId: 'ssh-fast', usernameVariable: 'USERNAME', passwordVariable: 'USERPASS')]) {
                    script {
                        sh "sshpass -p '$USERPASS' -v ssh -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no $USERNAME@$ip_fast 'cd python_combat_guide; docker run  python_combat_guide'"
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

My Jenkins Docker installation has the sshpass command, and I use it to connect via SSH, with username and Password to the server defined by ip_fast environment variable.

We defined the variable ip_fast in Manage Jenkins > Configure System.

There in Global Properties , Environment Variables I defined ip_fast:

In the Build Server I’ll make a new user and allow it to build Docker:

sudo adduser jenkins_build

sudo usermod -aG docker jenkins_build

The Credentials can be managed from Manage Jenkins > Manage Credentials.

You can see how I use all this combined in the Jenkinsfile so I don’t have to store credentials in the CVS and Jenkins (Docker Container) will connect via SSH to make the computer after ip_fast Ip, to build and run another Container. That Container will run with a command to do the Unit Testing. If something goes wrong, that is, if any program return an Exit Code different from 0, Jenkins will consider the build fail.

Take in count that $? only stores the Exit Code of the last program. So be careful if you pass multiple commands in one single line, as this may mask an error.

Separating the execution in multiple Stages helps to save time, as after a failure, execution will not continue.

Also visually is easy to see where the error is.

A base Dockerfile for my Jenkins deployments

Update: I’ve created a video and article about how to install jenkins in Docker with docker CLI and Blue Ocean plugins following the official Documentation. You may prefer to follow that one.

Update: Second part of this article: Creating Jenkins configurations for your projects

So I share with you my base Jenkins Dockerfile, so you can spawn a new Jenkins for your projects.

The Dockerfile installs Ubuntu 20.04 LTS as base image and add the required packages to run jenkins but also Development and Testing tools to use inside the Container to run Unit Testing on your code, for example. So you don’t need external Servers, for instance.

You will need 3 files:

  • Dockerfile
  • docker_run_jenkins.sh
  • requirements.txt

The requirements.txt file contains your PIP3 dependencies. In my case I only have pytest version 4.6.9 which is the default installed with Ubuntu 20.04, however, this way, I enforce that this and not any posterior version will be installed.

File requirements.txt:

pytest==4.6.9

The file docker_run_jenkins.txt start Jenkins when the Container is run and it will wait until the initial Admin password is generated and then it will display it.

File docker_run_jenkins.sh:

#!/bin/bash

echo "Starting Jenkins..."

service jenkins start

echo "Configure jenkins in http://127.0.0.1:8080"

s_JENKINS_PASSWORD_FILE="/var/lib/jenkins/secrets/initialAdminPassword"

i_PASSWORD_PRINTED=0

while [ true ];
do
    sleep 1
    if [ $i_PASSWORD_PRINTED -eq 1 ];
    then
        # We are nice with multitasking
        sleep 60
        continue
    fi

    if [ ! -f "$s_JENKINS_PASSWORD_FILE" ];
    then
        echo "File $s_FILE_ORIGIN does not exist"
    else
        echo "Password for Admin is:"
        cat $s_JENKINS_PASSWORD_FILE
        i_PASSWORD_PRINTED=1
    fi
done

That file has the objective to show you the default admin password, but you don’t need to do that, you can just start a shell into the Container and check manually by yourself.

However I added it to make it easier for you.

And finally you have the Dockerfile:

FROM ubuntu:20.04

LABEL Author="Carles Mateo" \
      Email="jenkins@carlesmateo.com" \
      MAINTAINER="Carles Mateo"

# Build this file with:
# sudo docker build -f Dockerfile -t jenkins:base .
# Run detached:
# sudo docker run --name jenkins_base -d -p 8080:8080 jenkins:base
# Run seeing the password:
# sudo docker run --name jenkins_base -p 8080:8080 -i -t jenkins:base
# After you CTRL + C you will continue with:
# sudo docker start
# To debug:
# sudo docker run --name jenkins_base -p 8080:8080 -i -t jenkins:base /bin/bash

ARG DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive

ENV SERVICE jenkins

RUN set -ex

RUN echo "Creating directories and copying code" \
    && mkdir -p /opt/${SERVICE}

COPY requirements.txt \
    docker_run_jenkins.sh \
    /opt/${SERVICE}/

# Java with Ubuntu 20.04 LST is 11, which is compatible with Jenkins.
RUN apt update \
    && apt install -y default-jdk \
    && apt install -y wget curl gnupg2 \
    && apt install -y git \
    && apt install -y python3 python3.8-venv python3-pip \
    && apt install -y python3-dev libsasl2-dev libldap2-dev libssl-dev \
    && apt install -y python3-venv \
    && apt install -y python3-pytest \
    && apt install -y sshpass \
    && wget -qO - https://pkg.jenkins.io/debian-stable/jenkins.io.key | apt-key add - \
    && echo "deb http://pkg.jenkins.io/debian-stable binary/" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/jenkins.list \
    && apt update \
    && apt -y install jenkins \
    && apt-get clean

RUN echo "Setting work directory and listening port"
WORKDIR /opt/${SERVICE}

RUN chmod +x docker_run_jenkins.sh

RUN pip3 install --upgrade pip \
    && pip3 install -r requirements.txt


EXPOSE 8080


ENTRYPOINT ["./docker_run_jenkins.sh"]

Build the Container

docker build -f Dockerfile -t jenkins:base .

Run the Container displaying the password

sudo docker run --name jenkins_base -p 8080:8080 -i -t jenkins:base

You need this password for starting the configuration process through the web.

Visit http://127.0.0.1:8080 to configure Jenkins.

Configure as usual

Resuming after CTRL + C

After you configured it, on the terminal, press CTRL + C.

And continue, detached, by running:

sudo docker start jenkins_base

The image is 1.2GB in size, and will allow you to run Python3, Virtual Environments, Unit Testing with pytest and has Java 11 (not all versions of Java are compatible with Jenkins), use sshpass to access other Servers via SSH with Username and Password…

Refreshing settings in a Docker immutable image with Python and Flask

This is a trick to restart a Service that is running on a immutable Docker, with some change, and you need to refresh the values very quickly without having to roll the CI/CD Jenkins Pipeline and uploading a new image.

So why would you need to do that?.

I can think about possible scenarios like:

  • Need to roll out an urgent fix in a time critical manner
  • Jenkins is broken
  • Somebody screw it on the git master branch
  • Docker Hub is down
  • GitHub is down
  • Your artifactory is down
  • The lines between your jumpbox or workstation and the secure Server are down and you have really few bandwidth
  • You have to fix something critical and you only have a phone with you and SSH only
  • Maybe the Dockerfile had latest, and the latest image has changed
FROM os:latest

The ideal is that if you work with immutable images, you roll out a new immutable image and that’s it.

But if for whatever reason you need to update this super fast, this trick may become really handy.

Let’s go for it!.

Normally you’ll start your container with a command similar to this:

docker run -d --rm -p 5000:5000 api_carlesmateo_com:v7 prod 

The first thing we have to do is to stop the container.

So:

docker ps

Locate your container across the list of running containers and stop it, and then restart without the –rm:

docker stop container_name
docker run -d -p 5000:5000 api_carlesmateo_com:v7 prod

the –rm makes the container to cleanup. By default a container’s file system persists even after the container exits. So don’t start it with –rm.

Ok, so login to the container:

docker exec -it container_name /bin/sh 

Edit the config you require to change, for example config.yml

If what you have to update is a password, and is encoded in base64, encode it:

echo -n "ThePassword" | base64
VGhlUGFzc3dvcmQ=

Stop the container. You can do it by stopping the container with docker stop or from inside the container, killing the listening process, probably a Python Flask.

If your Dockerfile ends with something like:

ENTRYPOINT ["./webservice.py"]

And webservice.py has Python Flask code similar to this:

#!/usr/bin/python3
#
# webservice.py
#
# Author: Carles Mateo
# Creation Date: 2020-05-10 20:50 GMT+1
# Description: A simple Flask Web Application
#              Part of the samples of https://leanpub.com/pythoncombatguide
#              More source code for the book at https://gitlab.com/carles.mateo/python_combat_guide
#


from flask import Flask, request
import logging

# Initialize Flask
app = Flask(__name__)


# Sample route so http://127.0.0.1/carles
@app.route('/carles', methods=['GET'])
def carles():
    logging.critical("A connection was established")
    return "200"

logging.info("Initialized...")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    app.run(host='0.0.0.0', port=5000, debug=True)

Then you can kill the process, and so ending the container, from inside the container by doing:

ps -ax | grep webservice
 5750 root     56:31 {webservice.py} /usr/bin/python /opt/webservice/webservice.py
kill -9 5790

This will finish the container the same way as docker stop container_name.

Then start the container (not run)

docker start container_name

You can now test from outside or from inside the container. If from inside:

/opt/webservice # wget localhost:5000/carles
Connecting to localhost:5000 (127.0.0.1:5000)
carles               100% |**************************************************************************************************************|     3  0:00:00 ETA
/opt/webservice # cat debug.log
2020-05-06 20:46:24,349 Initialized...
2020-05-06 20:46:24,359  * Running on http://0.0.0.0:5000/ (Press CTRL+C to quit)
2020-05-06 20:46:24,360  * Restarting with stat
2020-05-06 20:46:24,764 Initialized...
2020-05-06 20:46:24,771  * Debugger is active!
2020-05-06 20:46:24,772  * Debugger PIN: 123-456-789
2020-05-07 13:18:43,890 127.0.0.1 - - [07/May/2020 13:18:43] "GET /carles HTTP/1.1" 200 -

if you don’t use YAML files or what you need is to change the code, all this can be avoided as when you update the Python code, Flash realizes that and reloads. See this line in the logs:

2020-05-07 13:18:40,431  * Detected change in '/opt/webservice/wwebservice.py', reloading

The webservice.py autoreloads because we init Flask with debug set to on.

You can also start a container with shell directly:

sudo docker run -it ctop /bin/bash

A handy trick command line to get the usages of our Python Methods in the code

We all use powerful code analysis tool, but sometimes you’re presented with a problem and you have just… the terminal.

This Bash code is handy.

grep "def " /home/carles/code/gitlab/cloud/terraform/src/scale/lib/iscsi.py | tr "()" "  " | awk '{ print $2; }' |  grep -v "__init" | sort > ./function_names_iscsi.txt

So this basically will get all the methods (“def ” whatever), strip the parenthesis with tr, and get the second column with awk, so basically the method name, sort it and write it to the file.

Then I will cd to the src directory and execute the seconds part:

cd /home/carles/code/gitlab/cloud/terraform/src/
for fname in $(cat ~/function_names_iscsi.txt); do printf "%s: %s\n" "$fname" "$(grep -r $fname *|grep -v 'def ' -c)"; done > ~/functions_being_used.txt

That will produce a nice list with the number of times of the method being called, in the form of:

method_name: occurrences

That’s the equivalent to doing Find Usages is PyCharm.

It’s easy to identify dead code then, with method_name: 0.

You can also run this to your Jenkins to warn when there is Dead Code in your repository.