Category Archives: Python

News from the blog 2021-07-23

  • I’ve released v. 0.99 of carleslibs package
    This package includes utilities for:
    • Files and Directories handling
    • Date/Time retrieval
    • Python version detection

You can install it with:

pip install carleslibs

The minimum requirement declared is Python 3.6, although they work with Python 3.5 and Python 2.7, as I want to drop support for no longer supported versions.

Instructions can be found in here: carleslibs page.

Video: Beginners Python: teaching to work with for, range, lists, dicts

I recorded this class where some university colleagues and few of my students joined me.

It is recorded at Full HD. Increase Youtube’s quality to make sure the video is smoothly displayed.

You can download the source code from a previous class and this one in Gitlab:

https://gitlab.com/carles.mateo/python-classes

If you are looking for my technical books follow the link.

If you would like to become one of my students, or to have me as Mentor, check this section in my blog:

Classes and Mentor

A small Python + MySql + Docker program as a sample

This article can be found in my book Python Combat Guide.

I wrote this code and article in order to help my Python students to mix together Object Oriented Programming, MySql, and Docker.

You can have everything in action with only downloading the code and running the docker_build.sh and docker_run.sh scripts.

You can download the source code from:

https://gitlab.com/carles.mateo/python-mysql-example

and clone with:

git clone https://gitlab.com/carles.mateo/python-mysql-example.git

Installing the MySql driver

We are going to use Oracle’s official MySql driver for Python.

All the documentation is here:

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-python/en/

In order to install we will use pip.

To install it in Ubuntu:

pip install mysql-connector-python

In Mac Os X you have to use pip3 instead of pip.

However we are going to run everything from a Docker Container so the only thing you need is to have installed Docker.

If you prefer to install MySql in your computer (or Virtual Box instance) directly, skip the Docker steps.

Dockerfile

The Dockerfile is the file that Docker uses to build the Docker Container.

Ours is like that:

FROM ubuntu:20.04

MAINTAINER Carles Mateo

ARG DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive

RUN apt update && apt install -y python3 pip mysql-server vim mc wget curl && apt-get clean
RUN pip install mysql-connector-python

EXPOSE 3306

ENV FOLDER_PROJECT /var/mysql_carles

RUN mkdir -p $FOLDER_PROJECT

COPY docker_run_mysql.sh $FOLDER_PROJECT
COPY start.sql $FOLDER_PROJECT
COPY src $FOLDER_PROJECT

RUN chmod +x /var/mysql_carles/docker_run_mysql.sh

CMD ["/var/mysql_carles/docker_run_mysql.sh"]

The first line defines that we are going to use Ubuntu 20.04 (it’s a LTS version).

We install all the apt packages in a single line, as Docker works in layers, and what is used as disk space in the previous layer is not deleted even if we delete the files, so we want to run apt update, install all the packages, and clean the temporal files in one single step.

I also install some useful tools like: vim, mc, less, wget and curl.

We expose to outside the port 3306, in case you want to run the Python code from your computer, but having the MySql in the Container.

The last line executes a script that starts the MySql service, creates the table, the user, and add two rows and runs an infinite loop so the Docker does not finish.

build_docker.sh

build_docker.sh is a Bash script that builds the Docker Image for you very easily.

It stops the container and removes the previous image, so your hard drive does not fill with Docker images if you do modifications.

It checks for errors building and it also remembers you how to run and debug the Docker Container.

#!/bin/bash

# Execute with sudo

s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME="blog_carlesmateo_com_mysql"

printf "Stopping old image %s\n" "${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME}"
sudo docker stop "${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME}"

printf "Removing old image %s\n" "${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME}"
sudo docker rm "${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME}"

printf "Creating Docker Image %s\n" "${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME}"
sudo docker build -t ${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME} . --no-cache

i_EXIT_CODE=$?
if [ $i_EXIT_CODE -ne 0 ]; then
printf "Error. Exit code %s\n" ${i_EXIT_CODE}
exit
fi

echo "Ready to run ${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME} Docker Container"
echo "To run type: sudo docker run -d -p 3306:3306 --name ${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME} ${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME}"
echo "or just use run_in_docker.sh"
echo
echo "Debug running Docker:"
echo "docker exec -it ${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME} /bin/bash"
echo

docker_run.sh

I also provide a script named docker_run.sh that runs your Container easily, exposing the MySql port.

#!/bin/bash

# Execute with sudo

s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME="blog_carlesmateo_com_mysql"

docker run -d -p 3306:3306 --name ${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME} ${s_DOCKER_IMAGE_NAME}

echo "Showing running Instances"
docker ps

As you saw before I named the image after blog_carlesmateo_com_mysql.

I did that so basically I wanted to make sure that the name was unique, as the build_docker.sh deletes an image named like the name I choose, I didn’t want to use a generic name like “mysql” that may lead to you to delete the Docker Image inadvertently.

docker_run_mysql.sh

This script will run when the Docker Container is launched for the first time:

#!/bin/bash

# Allow to be queried from outside
sed -i '31 s/bind-address/#bind-address/' /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf

service mysql start

# Create a Database, a user with password, and permissions
cd /var/mysql_carles
mysql -u root < start.sql

while [ true ]; do sleep 60; done

With sed command we modify the line 31 of the the MySQL config file so we can connect from Outside the Docker Instance (bind-address: 127.0.0.1)

As you can see it executes the SQL contained in the file start.sql as root and we start MySql.

Please note: Our MySql installation has not set a password for root. It is only for Development purposes.

start.sql

The SQL file that will be ran inside our Docker Container.

CREATE DATABASE carles_database;


CREATE USER ‘python’@’localhost’ IDENTIFIED BY ‘blog.carlesmateo.com-db-password’;
CREATE USER ‘python’@’%’ IDENTIFIED BY ‘blog.carlesmateo.com-db-password’;
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON carles_database.* TO ‘python’@’localhost’;
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON carles_database.* TO ‘python’@’%’;


USE carles_database;


CREATE TABLE car_queue (
i_id_car int,
s_model_code varchar(25),
s_color_code varchar(25),
s_extras varchar(100),
i_right_side int,
s_city_to_ship varchar(25)
);

INSERT INTO car_queue (i_id_car, s_model_code, s_color_code, s_extras, i_right_side, s_city_to_ship) VALUES (1, "GOLF2021", "BLUE7", "COND_AIR, GPS, MULTIMEDIA_V3", 0, "Barcelona");
INSERT INTO car_queue (i_id_car, s_model_code, s_color_code, s_extras, i_right_side, s_city_to_ship) VALUES (2, "GOLF2021_PLUGIN_HYBRID", "BLUEMETAL_5", "COND_AIR, GPS, MULTIMEDIA_V3, SECURITY_V5", 1, "Cork");

As you can see it creates the user “python” with the password ‘blog.carlesmateo.com-db-password’ for access local and remote (%).

It also creates a Database named carles_database and grants all the permissions to the user “python”, for local and remote.

This is the user we will use to authenticate from out Python code.

Then we switch to use the carles_database and we create the car_queue table.

We insert two rows, as an example.

select_values_example.py

Finally the Python code that will query the Database.

import mysql.connector

if __name__ == "__main__":
    o_conn = mysql.connector.connect(user='python', password='blog.carlesmateo.com-db-password', database='carles_database')
    o_cursor = o_conn.cursor()

    s_query = "SELECT * FROM car_queue"

    o_cursor.execute(s_query)

    for a_row in o_cursor:
        print(a_row)

    o_cursor.close()
    o_conn.close()

Nothing special, we open a connection to the MySql and perform a query, and parse the cursor as rows/lists.

Please note: Error control is disabled so you may see any exception.

Executing the Container

First step is to build the Container.

From the directory where you cloned the project, execute:

sudo ./build_docker.sh

Then run the Docker Container:

sudo ./docker_run.sh

The script also performs a docker ps command, so you can see that it’s running.

Entering the Container and running the code

Now you can enter inside the Docker Container:

docker exec -it blog_carlesmateo_com_mysql /bin/bash

Then change to the directory where I installed the sample files:

cd /var/mysql_carles

And execute the Python 3 example:

python3 select_values_example.py

Tying together MySql and a Python Menu with Object Oriented Programming

In order to tie all together, and specially to give a consistent view to my students, to avoid showing only pieces but a complete program, and to show a bit of Objects Oriented in action I developed a small program which simulates the handling of a production queue for Volkswagen.

MySQL Library

First I created a library to handle MySQL operations.

lib/mysqllib.py

import mysql.connector


class MySql():

    def __init__(self, s_user, s_password, s_database, s_host="127.0.0.1", i_port=3306):
        self.s_user = s_user
        self.s_password = s_password
        self.s_database = s_database
        self.s_host = s_host
        self.i_port = i_port

        o_conn = mysql.connector.connect(host=s_host, port=i_port, user=s_user, password=s_password, database=s_database)
        self.o_conn = o_conn

    def query(self, s_query):
        a_rows = []

        o_cursor = self.o_conn.cursor()

        o_cursor.execute(s_query)

        for a_row in o_cursor:
            a_rows.append(a_row)

        o_cursor.close()

        return a_rows

    def insert(self, s_query):

        o_cursor = self.o_conn.cursor()

        o_cursor.execute(s_query)
        i_inserted_row_count = o_cursor.rowcount

        # Make sure data is committed to the database
        self.o_conn.commit()

        return i_inserted_row_count

    def delete(self, s_query):

        o_cursor = self.o_conn.cursor()

        o_cursor.execute(s_query)
        i_deleted_row_count = o_cursor.rowcount

        # Make sure data is committed to the database
        self.o_conn.commit()

        return i_deleted_row_count


    def close(self):

        self.o_conn.close()

Basically when this class is instantiated, a new connection to the MySQL specified in the Constructor is established.

We have a method query() to send SELECT queries.

We have a insert method, to send INSERT, UPDATE queries that returns the number of rows affected.

This method ensures to perform a commit to make sure changes persist.

We have a delete method, to send DELETE Sql queries that returns the number of rows deleted.

We have a close method which closes the MySql connection.

A Data Object: CarDO

Then I’ve defined a class, to deal with Data and interactions of the cars.

do/cardo.py


class CarDO():

    def __init__(self, i_id_car=0, s_model_code="", s_color_code="", s_extras="", i_right_side=0, s_city_to_ship=""):
        self.i_id_car = i_id_car
        self.s_model_code = s_model_code
        self.s_color_code = s_color_code
        self.s_extras = s_extras
        self.i_right_side = i_right_side
        self.s_city_to_ship = s_city_to_ship

        # Sizes for render
        self.i_width_id_car = 6
        self.i_width_model_code = 25
        self.i_width_color_code = 25
        self.i_width_extras = 50
        self.i_width_side = 5
        self.i_width_city_to_ship = 15

    def print_car_info(self):
        print("Id:", self.i_id_car)
        print("Model Code:", self.s_model_code)
        print("Color Code:", self.s_color_code)
        print("Extras:", self.s_extras)
        s_side = self.get_word_for_driving_side()
        print("Drive by side:", s_side)
        print("City to ship:", self.s_city_to_ship)

    def get_word_for_driving_side(self):
        if self.i_right_side == 1:
            s_side = "Right"
        else:
            s_side = "Left"

        return s_side

    def get_car_info_for_list(self):

        s_output = str(self.i_id_car).rjust(self.i_width_id_car) + " "
        s_output += self.s_model_code.rjust(self.i_width_model_code) + " "
        s_output += self.s_color_code.rjust(self.i_width_color_code) + " "
        s_output += self.s_extras.rjust(self.i_width_extras) + " "
        s_output += self.get_word_for_driving_side().rjust(self.i_width_side) + " "
        s_output += self.get_s_city_to_ship().rjust(self.i_width_city_to_ship)

        return s_output

    def get_car_header_for_list(self):
        s_output = str("Id Car").rjust(self.i_width_id_car) + " "
        s_output += "Model Code".rjust(self.i_width_model_code) + " "
        s_output += "Color Code".rjust(self.i_width_color_code) + " "
        s_output += "Extras".rjust(self.i_width_extras) + " "
        s_output += "Drive".rjust(self.i_width_side) + " "
        s_output += "City to Ship".rjust(self.i_width_city_to_ship)

        i_total_length = self.i_width_id_car + self.i_width_model_code + self.i_width_color_code + self.i_width_extras + self.i_width_side + self.i_width_city_to_ship
        # Add the space between fields
        i_total_length = i_total_length + 5

        s_output += "\n"
        s_output += "=" * i_total_length

        return s_output

    def get_i_id_car(self):
        return self.i_id_car

    def get_s_model_code(self):
        return self.s_model_code

    def get_s_color_code(self):
        return self.s_color_code

    def get_s_extras(self):
        return self.s_extras

    def get_i_right_side(self):
        return self.i_right_side

    def get_s_city_to_ship(self):
        return self.s_city_to_ship

Initially I was going to have a CarDO Object without any logic. Only with Data.

In OOP the variables of the Instance are called Properties, and the functions Methods.

Then I decided to add some logic, so I can show what’s the typical use of the objects.

So I will use CarDO as Data Object, but also to do few functions like printing the info of a Car.

Queue Manager

Finally the main program.

We also use Object Oriented Programming, and we use Dependency Injection to inject the MySQL Instance. That’s very practical to do Unit Testing.

from lib.mysqllib import MySql
from do.cardo import CarDO


class QueueManager():

    def __init__(self, o_mysql):
        self.o_mysql = o_mysql

    def exit(self):
        exit(0)

    def main_menu(self):
        while True:
            print("Main Menu")
            print("=========")
            print("")
            print("1. Add new car to queue")
            print("2. List all cars to queue")
            print("3. View car by Id")
            print("4. Delete car from queue by Id")
            print("")
            print("0. Exit")
            print("")

            s_option = input("Choose your option:")
            if s_option == "1":
                self.add_new_car()
            if s_option == "2":
                self.see_all_cars()
            if s_option == "3":
                self.see_car_by_id()
            if s_option == "4":
                self.delete_by_id()

            if s_option == "0":
                self.exit()

    def get_all_cars(self):
        s_query = "SELECT * FROM car_queue"

        a_rows = self.o_mysql.query(s_query)
        a_o_cars = []

        for a_row in a_rows:
            i_id_car = a_row[0]
            s_model_code = a_row[1]
            s_color_code = a_row[2]
            s_extras = a_row[3]
            i_right_side = a_row[4]
            s_city_to_ship = a_row[5]

            o_car = CarDO(i_id_car=i_id_car, s_model_code=s_model_code, s_color_code=s_color_code, s_extras=s_extras, i_right_side=i_right_side, s_city_to_ship=s_city_to_ship)
            a_o_cars.append(o_car)

        return a_o_cars

    def get_car_by_id(self, i_id_car):
        b_success = False
        o_car = None

        s_query = "SELECT * FROM car_queue WHERE i_id_car=" + str(i_id_car)

        a_rows = self.o_mysql.query(s_query)

        if len(a_rows) == 0:
            # False, None
            return b_success, o_car

        i_id_car = a_rows[0][0]
        s_model_code = a_rows[0][1]
        s_color_code = a_rows[0][2]
        s_extras = a_rows[0][3]
        i_right_side = a_rows[0][4]
        s_city_to_ship = a_rows[0][5]

        o_car = CarDO(i_id_car=i_id_car, s_model_code=s_model_code, s_color_code=s_color_code, s_extras=s_extras, i_right_side=i_right_side, s_city_to_ship=s_city_to_ship)
        b_success = True

        return b_success, o_car

    def replace_apostrophe(self, s_text):
        return s_text.replace("'", "´")

    def insert_car(self, o_car):

        s_sql = """INSERT INTO car_queue 
                                (i_id_car, s_model_code, s_color_code, s_extras, i_right_side, s_city_to_ship) 
                         VALUES 
                                (""" + str(o_car.get_i_id_car()) + ", '" + o_car.get_s_model_code() + "', '" + o_car.get_s_color_code() + "', '" + o_car.get_s_extras() + "', " + str(o_car.get_i_right_side()) + ", '" + o_car.get_s_city_to_ship() + "');"

        i_inserted_row_count = self.o_mysql.insert(s_sql)

        if i_inserted_row_count > 0:
            print("Inserted", i_inserted_row_count, " row/s")
            b_success = True
        else:
            print("It was impossible to insert the row")
            b_success = False

        return b_success

    def add_new_car(self):
        print("Add new car")
        print("===========")

        while True:
            s_id_car = input("Enter new ID: ")
            if s_id_car == "":
                print("A numeric Id is needed")
                continue

            i_id_car = int(s_id_car)

            if i_id_car < 1:
                continue

            # Check if that id existed already
            b_success, o_car = self.get_car_by_id(i_id_car=i_id_car)
            if b_success is False:
                # Does not exist
                break

            print("Sorry, this Id already exists")

        s_model_code = input("Enter Model Code:")
        s_color_code = input("Enter Color Code:")
        s_extras = input("Enter extras comma separated:")
        s_right_side = input("Enter R for Right side driven:")
        if s_right_side.upper() == "R":
            i_right_side = 1
        else:
            i_right_side = 0
        s_city_to_ship = input("Enter the city to ship the car:")

        # Sanitize SQL replacing apostrophe
        s_model_code = self.replace_apostrophe(s_model_code)
        s_color_code = self.replace_apostrophe(s_color_code)
        s_extras = self.replace_apostrophe(s_extras)
        s_city_to_ship = self.replace_apostrophe(s_city_to_ship)

        o_car = CarDO(i_id_car=i_id_car, s_model_code=s_model_code, s_color_code=s_color_code, s_extras=s_extras, i_right_side=i_right_side, s_city_to_ship=s_city_to_ship)
        b_success = self.insert_car(o_car)

    def see_all_cars(self):
        print("")

        a_o_cars = self.get_all_cars()

        if len(a_o_cars) > 0:
            print(a_o_cars[0].get_car_header_for_list())
        else:
            print("No cars in queue")
            print("")
            return

        for o_car in a_o_cars:
            print(o_car.get_car_info_for_list())

        print("")

    def see_car_by_id(self, i_id_car=0):
        if i_id_car == 0:
            s_id = input("Car Id:")
            i_id_car = int(s_id)

        s_id_car = str(i_id_car)

        b_success, o_car = self.get_car_by_id(i_id_car=i_id_car)
        if b_success is False:
            print("Error, car id: " + s_id_car + " not located.")
            return False

        print("")
        o_car.print_car_info()
        print("")

        return True

    def delete_by_id(self):

        s_id = input("Enter Id of car to delete:")
        i_id_car = int(s_id)

        if i_id_car == 0:
            print("Invalid Id")
            return

        # reuse see_car_by_id
        b_found = self.see_car_by_id(i_id_car=i_id_car)
        if b_found is False:
            return

        s_delete = input("Are you sure you want to DELETE. Type Y to delete: ")
        if s_delete.upper() == "Y":
            s_sql = "DELETE FROM car_queue WHERE i_id_car=" + str(i_id_car)
            i_num = self.o_mysql.delete(s_sql)

            print(i_num, " Rows deleted")

            # if b_success is True:
            #     print("Car deleted successfully from the queue")


if __name__ == "__main__":

    try:

        o_mysql = MySql(s_user="python", s_password="blog.carlesmateo.com-db-password", s_database="carles_database", s_host="127.0.0.1", i_port=3306)

        o_queue_manager = QueueManager(o_mysql=o_mysql)
        o_queue_manager.main_menu()
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        print("Detected CTRL + C. Exiting")

This program talks to MySQL, that we have started in a Docker previously.

We have access from inside the Docker Container, or from outside.

The idea of this simple program is to use a library for dealing with MySql, and objects for dealing with the Cars. The class CarDO contributes to the render of its data in the screen.

To enter inside the Docker once you have generated it and is running, do:

docker exec -it blog_carlesmateo_com_mysql /bin/bash

Then:

cd /var/mysql_carles 
python3 queue_manager.py

Bonus

I added a file called queue_manager.php so you can see how easy is to render a HTML page with data coming from the Database, from PHP.

News from the Blog 2021-07-01

  • Google Instances’ Performance
    I’ve updated the CMIPS score for the latest Google instances vs last Amazon’s I tried and baremetals.

This is the changelog for latest version:

v. 0.99
 A whole new chapter showing sorting in Python and lambdas. (.sort() and sorted() package First)

 I show writing lambdas for Sorting, and also what makes them crash.

 Explained why Lambdas are not recommended unless you use for working with data, like for sorting or filtering out, and unless you know what you are doing. They are difficult to Debug.

 Explained about PEP8 tool to validate style.

 Explaining why we define Instance variables in the Constructor.

 Provided more samples for Flask Applications.

 Fixed code sample https://gitlab.com/carles.mateo/python_combat_guide/-/blob/master/src/keywords.py as the editor removed the white line spaces.

 Added more books to the bibliography

 I explain the importance of running Unit Testing as both root and as regular users.

 Explain how to run as regular user inside a Docker Container.

 Explained requirements.txt file. And how integrates PyCharm to create venv/ Virtual Environment.

 Also how it is used in Dockerfile to make sure all the dependencies are satisfied in the Docker Container.

As any project committed to saving human lives, she has all my support and admiration.

A base Dockerfile for my Jenkins deployments

So I share with you my base Jenkins Dockerfile, so you can spawn a new Jenkins for your projects.

The Dockerfile installs Ubuntu 20.04 LTS as base image and add the required packages to run jenkins but also Development and Testing tools to use inside the Container to run Unit Testing on your code, for example. So you don’t need external Servers, for instance.

You will need 3 files:

  • Dockerfile
  • docker_run_jenkins.sh
  • requirements.txt

The requirements.txt file contains your PIP3 dependencies. In my case I only have pytest version 4.6.9 which is the default installed with Ubuntu 20.04, however, this way, I enforce that this and not any posterior version will be installed.

File requirements.txt:

pytest==4.6.9

The file docker_run_jenkins.txt start Jenkins when the Container is run and it will wait until the initial Admin password is generated and then it will display it.

File docker_run_jenkins.sh:

#!/bin/bash

echo "Starting Jenkins..."

service jenkins start

echo "Configure jenkins in http://127.0.0.1:8080"

s_JENKINS_PASSWORD_FILE="/var/lib/jenkins/secrets/initialAdminPassword"

i_PASSWORD_PRINTED=0

while [ true ];
do
    sleep 1
    if [ $i_PASSWORD_PRINTED -eq 1 ];
    then
        # We are nice with multitasking
        sleep 60
        continue
    fi

    if [ ! -f "$s_JENKINS_PASSWORD_FILE" ];
    then
        echo "File $s_FILE_ORIGIN does not exist"
    else
        echo "Password for Admin is:"
        cat $s_JENKINS_PASSWORD_FILE
        i_PASSWORD_PRINTED=1
    fi
done

That file has the objective to show you the default admin password, but you don’t need to do that, you can just start a shell into the Container and check manually by yourself.

However I added it to make it easier for you.

And finally you have the Dockerfile:

FROM ubuntu:20.04

LABEL Author="Carles Mateo" \
      Email="jenkins@carlesmateo.com" \
      MAINTAINER="Carles Mateo"

# Build this file with:
# sudo docker build -f Dockerfile -t jenkins:base .
# Run detached:
# sudo docker run --name jenkins_base -d -p 8080:8080 jenkins:base
# Run seeing the password:
# sudo docker run --name jenkins_base -p 8080:8080 -i -t jenkins:base
# After you CTRL + C you will continue with:
# sudo docker start
# To debug:
# sudo docker run --name jenkins_base -p 8080:8080 -i -t jenkins:base /bin/bash

ARG DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive

ENV SERVICE jenkins

RUN set -ex

RUN echo "Creating directories and copying code" \
    && mkdir -p /opt/${SERVICE}

COPY requirements.txt \
    docker_run_jenkins.sh \
    /opt/${SERVICE}/

# Java with Ubuntu 20.04 LST is 11, which is compatible with Jenkins.
RUN apt update \
    && apt install -y default-jdk \
    && apt install -y wget curl gnupg2 \
    && apt install -y git \
    && apt install -y python3 python3.8-venv python3-pip \
    && apt install -y python3-dev libsasl2-dev libldap2-dev libssl-dev \
    && apt install -y python3-venv \
    && apt install -y python3-pytest \
    && apt install -y sshpass \
    && wget -qO - https://pkg.jenkins.io/debian-stable/jenkins.io.key | apt-key add - \
    && echo "deb http://pkg.jenkins.io/debian-stable binary/" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/jenkins.list \
    && apt update \
    && apt -y install jenkins \
    && apt-get clean

RUN echo "Setting work directory and listening port"
WORKDIR /opt/${SERVICE}

RUN chmod +x docker_run_jenkins.sh

RUN pip3 install --upgrade pip \
    && pip3 install -r requirements.txt


EXPOSE 8080


ENTRYPOINT ["./docker_run_jenkins.sh"]

Build the Container

docker build -f Dockerfile -t jenkins:base .

Run the Container displaying the password

sudo docker run --name jenkins_base -p 8080:8080 -i -t jenkins:base

You need this password for starting the configuration process through the web.

Visit http://127.0.0.1:8080 to configure Jenkins.

Configure as usual

Resuming after CTRL + C

After you configured it, on the terminal, press CTRL + C.

And continue, detached, by running:

sudo docker start jenkins_base

The image is 1.2GB in size, and will allow you to run Python3, Virtual Environments, Unit Testing with pytest and has Java 11 (not all versions of Java are compatible with Jenkins), use sshpass to access other Servers via SSH with Username and Password…

Why I propose you to use Python 3.8, at least, for your Internal Automation Tools in Docker Containers

This article is written at 2021-03-22 so this conclusion will evolve as time passes.

Some of my articles are checked after 7 years, so be advised this choice will not be valid in a year. Although the reasoning and considerations to take in count will be the same.

I answer to the question: Why Carles, do you suggest to adopt Python 3.8, and not 3.9 or 3.7 for our Internal Automation Tools?.

Reliability and Maturity

If you look at page https://devguide.python.org/#status-of-python-branches you will see the next table:

So you can see that:

  • Python 3.6 was released on 2016-12-23 and will get EOL on 2021-12-23.
    • That’s EOL in 9 months. We don’t want to recommend that.
  • Python 3.7 was released on 2018-06-27 and will get EOL 2023-06-27.
    • That’s 2 years and 3 months from now. The Status of development is focus in Security bugfixes.
  • Python 3.9 was released 2020-10-05 that’s 5 months approx from now.
    • Honestly, I don’t recommend for Production a version of Software that has not been in the market for a year.
      • Most of the bugs and security bugs appears before the first year.
      • New features released, often are not widely fully tested , and bugs found and fixed, once a year has passed.
  • Python 3.8 was released on 2019-10-14.
    • That means that the new features have been tested for a year and five months approximately.
    • This is enough time to make appear most bugs.
    • EOL is 2024-10, that is 3 years and 7 months from now. A good balance of EOL for the effort to standardize.
    • Finally Python 3.8 is the Python mainline for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.
      • If our deploy strategy is synchronized, we want to use Long Time Support versions, of course.

So my recommendation would be, at least for your internal tools, to use containers based in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS with Python 3.8.

We know Docker images will be bigger using Ubuntu 20.04 LTS than using other images, but that disk space is really a small difference, and we get the advantage of being able to install additional packages in the Containers if we need to debug.

An Ubuntu 20.04 Image with Pyhton 3.8 and pytest, uses 540 MB.

This is a small amount of space nowadays. Even if very basic Alpine images can use 25MB only, when you install Python they start to grow close to Ubuntu, to 360MB. The difference is not much, and if you used Alpine and you have suffered from Community packages being updated and becoming incompatible with wheel and you lost hours fixing the dependencies, you’ll really appreciate using my Ubuntu LTS packages approach.

A simple script to upload a PIP package

If you want to create a package and distribute it like through pip in record time, you can customize my script from cmemgzip for Ubuntu 20.04.

Here is the official documentation if you want to do everything manually:

https://packaging.python.org/tutorials/packaging-projects

Here is the script customized for Test Environment.

You’ll need to create a Test account in test.pypi.org

#!/bin/bash

PACKAGE="cmemgzip-test"
mkdir $PACKAGE
mkdir $PACKAGE/src
mkdir $PACKAGE/src/$PACKAGE
mkdir $PACKAGE/tests

cp LICENSE $PACKAGE/

echo "[build-system]" > $PACKAGE/pyproject.toml
echo "requires = [" >> $PACKAGE/pyproject.toml
echo '    "setuptools>=42",' >> $PACKAGE/pyproject.toml
echo '    "wheel"' >> $PACKAGE/pyproject.toml
echo "]" >> $PACKAGE/pyproject.toml
echo 'build-backend = "setuptools.build_meta"' >> $PACKAGE/pyproject.toml

cat <<EOF > $PACKAGE/setup.cfg
[metadata]
name = cmemgzip
version = 0.4.1
author = Carles Mateo
author_email = cmemgzip@carlesmateo.com
description = Compresses files in memory and replaces the original by a .gz file when there is no space on drive.
long_description = file: README.md
long_description_content_type = text/markdown
url = https://gitlab.com/carles.mateo/cmemgzip
project_urls =
    Bug Tracker = https://gitlab.com/carles.mateo/cmemgzip/issues
classifiers =
    Programming Language :: Python :: 3
    License :: OSI Approved :: MIT License
    Operating System :: OS Independent

[options]
package_dir =
    = src
packages = find:
python_requires = >=3.6

[options.packages.find]
where = src
EOF

cp README.md $PACKAGE/
cp manual-cmemgzip.pdf $PACKAGE/
cp cmemgzip.py $PACKAGE/src/$PACKAGE/
touch $PACKAGE/src/$PACKAGE/__init__.py
cp test_*.py $PACKAGE/tests/


python3 -m pip install --upgrade build

# Install dependencies
sudo apt-get install python3.8-venv

python3 -m pip install --user --upgrade twine


echo
echo "Entering into directory $PACKAGE"
cd $PACKAGE

echo
echo "Generating distribution binaries"
python3 -m build

# Create account in: https://test.pypi.org/manage/account/

# Create API Token
# https://test.pypi.org/manage/account/

echo
echo "Going to upload the packages. Use your username and password"
echo
python3 -m twine upload --repository testpypi dist/cmemgzip*

The changes for the script to production are just a different package name, and last line:

python3 -m twine upload --repository pypi dist/cmemgzip*

Obviously you’ll need to use credentials for Production.

Reinstall PIP in Windows 10 after it got removed

If accidentally you removed PIP from your windows machine, or you attempted a PIP upgrade which failed after removing the current version, and let you unable to install it anymore, you can address it this way.

python -m ensurepip --default-pip

After this, you can upgrade it:

python -m install --upgrade pip setuptools wheel

A live session refactoring and adding Unit Testing to my Python3 project cmemgzip

I refactor and add unit testing to my actual project cmemgzip while I comment every step so you can learn the whys and the reasoning.

Open video in full screen with max 1080 quality, in order to see the code clearly.

Update 2021-03-03: I added a third part. I’m tired but still is worth watching.

Raspberry Pi: Solving the problem GPIO.setup(self.number, GPIO.IN, self.GPIO_PULL_UPS[self._pull]) RuntimeError: Not running on a RPi! in Ubuntu 20.04LTS

So you are trying to program the Raspberry expansion PINS in Python, for example for this 3D LED Christmas Tree, and you’re getting the error:

GPIO.setup(self.number, GPIO.IN, self.GPIO_PULL_UPS[self._pull])
RuntimeError: Not running on a RPi!

I’m running this on Ubuntu 20.04LTS with a Raspberry 4.

The first thing:

Make sure you have an official Raspberry Pi charger.

Or at least, make sure your USB charger provides enough intensity to power the Raspberry and the LEDs.

The LED power comes from the motherboard and if Raspberry Pi has not enough energy this is not going to work.

My colleague Michela had her tree not working because of the charger was not able to provide enough energy. When she ordered a new charger, it worked like a charm.

Install the base Software

In order to communicate with General Purpose Input Output ports (GPIO) you need to install this Software:

sudo apt install python3-pip python3-gpiozero
sudo pip3 install giozero

In order to run the 3D LED Christmas Tree code samples

sudo pip3 install colorzero
sudo pip3 install rpi.gpio --upgrade

Reboot

It may be not required in some cases.

Download the Source code

https://github.com/ThePiHut/rgbxmastree#rgbxmastree

Run the samples as root

I saw many people stuck, in the forums, because of that.

To work with the LEDs you need to run the samples as root.

Where I used it?

I used it in my Open Source monitor Software CTOP.py in order to show the plugins/extensions capability of it. :)